Pink Rose Chocolate {Raw, Sugar free}

Pink Rose Chocolate {Raw, Sugar free}
February 1, 2017 megsri8
pink rose chocolate

Hello! In preparation for Valentine’s day I wanted to share with you a recipe for pink rose chocolate. I had created these adorable roses a while ago when I was experimenting with making white chocolate. I wanted it to be pink in colour and added a little beetroot to it as a natural colouring. It turned out to be such a lovely pink that I decided to set it in my rose moulds. At that time I hadn’t perfected the recipe but I shared some of these images on my Instagram account and I received so much positive feedback! I felt that I had to perfect the recipe for these pink rose chocolates and share it with you, and what better time than nearing Valentines day!

pink rose chocolateNow I am not a big believer in Valentine’s day. However I am always enthusiastic about creating something around a theme. I love the creativity of it! Hence these pretty pink rose chocolates are dedicated to the romantic theme of Valentine’s day! The recipe for these cuties are based on my recipe and technique of Tempered Raw White Chocolate which I had shared with you a couple of weeks ago. It is a healthy combination of cashews, vegan protein powder, xylitol and cacao butter. The xylitol is necessary in order for the chocolate to remain white or keep the colour you choose. Xylitol is also low on calories and GI and does not give you a sugar rush. The cashews and protein powder helps not only in texture but also in increasing the nutrient density in these chocolates.

pink rose chocolate

It is very important that you follow the steps for tempering these chocolates. I have written in details the benefits of tempering chocolate in my previous recipe post which you can read here. Since we are using more complex moulds like the rose mould, it is important that the steps to tempering is followed or else the chocolate will not come out of its mould perfectly. Hence you will need a thermometer to make these pink rose chocolates to ensure the correct temperature is reached for perfect tempering. I have provided detailed steps below and if you have any queries or difficulties let me know in the comments below and I will do my best to help you out.

pink rose chocolate

I love colouring my food with natural colours. Vibrant rainbow food makes me happy! I used the juice of a grated beetroot as the natural colouring for these pink rose chocolates. I followed the Minimalist Baker’s method to extract the juice. I also added a splash of rose water to give it a rose flavour. This is optional and you can leave the chocolate pink but I feel the rose water adds another dimension to this raw chocolate. I have used Rose shaped and heart shaped silicon moulds to keep to the Valentine’s day theme. Feel free to use any moulds you have at home, even an ice cube tray will do!

pink rose chocolate

pink rose chocolate

I do hope you give this recipe a try! Whether it is to celebrate Valentine’s day with someone special or to treat yourself to something pretty and delectable, these healthy pink rose chocolates are worth a try!  If you do recreate this recipe then I would so appreciate it if you would let me know how it turns out in the comments below. If you share it on Instagram then please do use the tag @meghnas_ on the image and #meghnas so that I can appreciate your wonderful creations as well and re-share them on my account!

 

Print Recipe
Pink Rose Chocolate {Raw, Sugar free}
pink rose chocolate
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
chocolates
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
chocolates
Ingredients
pink rose chocolate
Instructions
  1. Grind the cashew nuts and xylitol into a fine powder separately. Roughly chop the cacao butter or grate it. I get mine as chips so I use it directly.
  2. Bring water to boil in a sauce pan. Find a heat proof glass bowl which will sit easily over the mouth of the sauce pan without the water touching its base. Add the cacao butter to this glass bowl. Then pass the powdered xylitol, powdered cashew nuts and the protein powder through a sieve and over the cacao butter chips. The sieve ensures any clumps or bigger pieces of cashew are removed and your chocolate remains smooth.
  3. Once the water is bubbling, reduce to simmer and carefully place the glass bowl on top of the sauce pan. Do not mix or stir till 50% of the cacao butter has melted. Then switch off the heat and gently stir the mixture using the wooden spoon or spatula. The cacao butter will melt with the steam arising even though the heat is switched of.
  4. Using a candy or meat thermometer make sure the temperature does not go beyond 42C if you want to ensure this chocolate is completely raw. As a precaution as soon as the temperature hits 34C or 35C remove it from the heat.
  5. While the cacao butter is melting, extract the beetroot juice and keep it ready. Once you take the cacao butter mix off the heat, immediately add the beetroot juice. First add a quarter spoon of the beetroot juice and check the colour. If you want the chocolate to be more light pink then this is all the amount of beetroot juice you will need. If you want it a darker pink like my version then add the entire teaspoon of beetroot juice. If you want it redder, slowly add more beetroot juice.
  6. Next add the rose water and taste. If you want the rose flavour to be stronger then first add half a teaspoon of rose water and taste again. Keep adding a little more if you want a stronger rose flavour.
  7. Mix in both the rose water and beetroot extract thoroughly and now start the tempering process. Keep stirring using the spatula to rapidly cool down. Ideally the bigger the bowl is, the faster it will cool down, so transfer into a big bowl to cool down rapidly. Keep stirring every few minutes and check the temperature every few minutes. You need to get the temperature down to 29C or less.
  8. This tempering process may take anywhere between 10 minutes to 25 minutes. It will slowly start thickening and get a glossy finish. Once it has reached to 29C or below pour into the rose shaped and heart shaped silicon moulds. Place the mould onto a tray or metal plate and bang the tray or plate firmly on the table top. Keep banging the tray for a few minutes. Make sure the chocolate does not pour out of the moulds. The point is to remove any air bubbles or air pockets in the chocolate. You will soon see tiny air bubbles coming to the surface.
  9. Place the tray in the refrigerator for a few minutes. It should be set in 10 minutes but leave it for 30 minutes as a precaution. Once set peel the mould away. You will know if you have properly tempered the chocolate if the chocolate has contracted away from the sides of the mould and falls out easily. It will also be crisp, have a snap on breaking into two and a glossy sheen. If it too soft or sticks to the mould that means it has not tempered and you will need to melt it back and start the tempering process again.
  10. You can store this in your fridge for a week and in your freezer for a couple of months. Serve it over your smoothie bowls, eat it as a dessert or melt it over your cake. The options are endless!
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